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The Misophonia Hub has been developed by the University of Sussex, funded by the REAM Foundation.

 

University of Sussex Research Team

 

Prof J Simner

Prof J Ward

Dr L Rinaldi

Dr J Alvarez

Dr N Andermane

 

Professor Julia Simner, Director of misophonia child research. Julia Simner is a professor of neuropsychology specialising in multisensory research. She runs the MULTISENSE lab at the University of Sussex where her research focusses on sensory differences. She has been widely published in well regarded science journals (e.g., Nature), and in over 100 newspaper and media articles worldwide. She is the Science Officer for the UK Synaesthesia Association, and the author of several books (Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia; and Synaesthesia: A Very Short Introduction).

Professor Jamie Ward, Director of misophonia adult researchJamie Ward is a professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, specialising in sensory differences and their co-morbidities. He is a leading researcher in his field of sensory differences, publishing widely, and providing feedback to the public (e.g., his TedX talk). He is the President of the British Association of Cognitive Neuroscience, Founding Editor of the journal 'Cognitive Neuroscience' and the author of a number of books (The Frog That Croaked Blue; and The Student's Guide to Cognitive Neuroscience).

Dr Louisa Rinaldi, Postdoctoral researcher. Louisa Rinaldi has a PhD in Neuropsychology from the University of Sussex, as well as a BSc in Psychology and an MSc in Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience from Sheffield Hallam University. Her PhD focused on sensory differences in children, looking particularly at synaesthesia, and she now focusses on misophonia. Her research has shown how sensory differences can impact the cognition, personality, health and well-being of children and adults. 

Dr Nora Andermane, Postdoctoral researcher. Nora Andermane has a PhD in Psychology from the University of Sussex and a BSc in Experimental Psychology from the University of Bristol. Her PhD was an investigation into individual differences in visual awareness, specifically focusing on change detection. After her PhD, she has been exploring the nature of forgetting of episodic memories and how memory strength relates to individual differences in visual imagery. She is currently a research fellow on the REAM misophonia project. 

Dr James Alvarez, Programmer. James Alvarez has a BSc in Psychology from University of Nottingham, an MSc in Psychological research methods from the University of Exeter and a Phd investigating colour and language from the University of Surrey. He is currently working as a programmer at the University of Sussex, and is the programmer on the REAM misophonia project. 

Our contact details can be found here

 

 

External Consultants

 

Dr J Gregory

Prof D Baguley

 

Dr Jane Gregory, Clinical psychologist, University of Oxford. Jane Gregory is a clinical psychologist and doctoral research fellow at the University of Oxford. She established two specialist national misophonia psychology services in London and Oxford, providing therapy for individuals with misophonia on the NHS. Jane was awarded a three-year research fellowship from the Wellcome Trust to test components of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for reducing the intensity and impact of misophonia. She is the co-author of the S-Five, a questionnaire that measures the severity and complexity of misophonia in adults. She is currently developing therapist training for misophonia through the Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre.

Professor David Baguley, Audiologist, University of Nottingham. David Baguley is a Professor of Hearing Sciences at the University of Nottingham. David has both research and clinical expertise in hearing, and has co-authored over 150 research papers, many book chapters, and has co-authored and edited several books. He is interested in tinnitus, hyperacusis, and other conditions of the human auditory system, most recently, the as hearing and balance problems that arise associated with platinum chemotherapy for cancer in adults and children. He also has both clinical and research expertise in misophonia, including recent work showing the prevalence of misophonia (Naylor et al., 2020).